Battling the Tradition of Genital Mutilation in Egypt

Thanks to Master’s bitch for the pointer to this article.  Here and here are articles about what FGM actually entails.  And I fall to my knees, yet again thankful I live in the UK.  I do not have to fear planes, soldiers or having my clitoris removed. 

Women Need Their Clitoris!

clipped from www.nytimes.com

At Tanta University in Egypt, the backdrop for speakers at a symposium in August read, “The Beginning of the End, No to Female Circumcision.” The Egyptian government, religious authorities and activists have united in an effort to end the tradition, which is so common that a survey in 2005 found that 96 percent of Egyptian women had undergone it.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Egyptian health care workers and nursing students held a moment of silence to honor a 13 year-old girl who died in August during an operation to have her clitoris removed. After the death, Egyptian authorities shut down the clinic, but an elder in the village in which the girl lived said,”Even if the state doesn’t like it, we will circumcise the girls.”

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Marie Assaad, an 84-year-old anthropologist, has been involved in the fight against genital cutting since the 1950s. “I never thought I would live to see this day,” she said, referring to an article on the subject in a widely circulated daily newspaper. Ms. Assaad helped to convince Suzanne Mubarak, the influential wife of Egypt’s president, to take up the issue.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Young girls outside the shuttered clinic where a 13-year-old girl died in August during a genital cutting operation.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

 

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Men at a tea shop across the street from the clinic. One aspect of the government’s attempts to end the practice has been to produce a booklet explaining that the procedure is not called for in Islam.In neighboring Saudi Arabia, the practice is viewed as abhorrent, a relic of pre-Islamic traditions.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

clipped from www.nytimes.com

Egyptian actors perform the play “Think Twice,” designed to raise awareness of social issues including drug abuse, unemployment and genital cutting. In this scene, a family is considering whether a young girl should undergo the operation.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Times

clipped from www.nytimes.com

The play has been performed in villages across Egypt. Egypt’s health ministry, which ordered a nationwide ban in 1996, is making a new effort at enforcement.

Photo: Shawn Baldwin for The New York Time

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About bookmole
I am pro-choice. You make yours, I'll make mine, okay?

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